Weather Ready Research Award Program

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Ready Nation (WRN) initiative readies communities for extreme weather, water, and climate events. Taking advanced action to prepare people and places for extreme events can reduce the most devastating impacts from tornadoes, hurricanes, flooding, wildfires, and blizzards.

While NOAA is taking major steps towards building a weather ready nation, the agency cannot do this work alone. With this in mind, the Natural Hazards Center—with support from the National Science Foundation and the NOAA Weather Program Office, and in partnership with the National Severe Storms Laboratory and the National Weather Service —is issuing a series of funding calls for social, behavioral, and economic sciences to advance the understanding of how to most effectively prepare for and communicate about extreme weather, water, and climate events. This new initiative is designed to promote knowledge while also building a diverse cadre of weather ready researchers.

Open Calls for Proposals

The Natural Hazards Center is currently accepting proposals for: Call 4: Wildfire Ready Quick Response Research and Data Publication, Call 5: Flood Ready Research and Data Publication, and Call 6: Tornado Ready Research and Data Publication. All proposals must be led by a researcher in the social, behavioral, or economic sciences. Collaborators from other disciplines are welcome. Apply now!

Questions?

Please contact the Natural Hazards Center team at haz.research.awards@colorado.edu.

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Acknowledgements

The Weather Ready Research Award program is based on work supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Program Office and the National Severe Storms Laboratory through supplemental funding to the National Science Foundation (NSF Award #1635593). Opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations produced by this program are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of NOAA, NSF, or the Natural Hazards Center.